The Weekly Wall | #005 | Morag Myerscough, Smithfield Market

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The Weekly Wall | #005 | Joy & Peace by Morag Mysercough and Luke Morgan

Joy: Silk St, London EC2Y 8DS

Peace: Smithfield Rotunda Garden, West Smithfield, London EC1A 9DY

Nearest Station: Barbican

Continuing with the them of using art to bring love and happiness, the latest weekly wall is a new temporary installation in two parts, titled Joy and Peace and created by Morag Myerscough (whom was recently cited as Camille Walala’s biggest inspiration) as well as Luke Morgan and a team of Studio Myerscough painters.

Commissioned by Culture Mile, the projects are part of a new initiative backed by the City of London Corporation together with the Barbican, Guildhall School of Music & Drama, London Symphony Orchestra and the Museum of London, to promote the Big Smoke as a destination for culture and creativity.

Now, you may have seen that Natasha Nuttall of Graphique Fantastique has been working away with Myerscough over the summer and these are two of the projects she pledged a helping hand to. We wouldn’t very well be celebrating unless we all went and visited the project together and Natasha talked us through the process of creating such a large-scale installation…

Designed to exude positive energy Joy & Peace utilises six symbols: the heart, representing love; the globe, representing society; the sun, representing joy; the eye, representing wide open; the star, representing energy; the flower, representing peace.

Myerscough has a trademark use of bold and bright colours, with neon playing an important role in her work. The Peace Garden, a huge circular structure, plays with pattern and shapes, producing geometric illusions throughout West Smithfield Rotunda Garden. Candy coloured lollipop sticks line the outer seating in the park and the entrance walls incorporate patterns developed form workshops with local schools.

Just down the road, the Joy installation along Silk Street stands in stark contrast to the brutalist buildings of the Barbican estate and represents powers working together in harmony. I mean, Natasha and I were certainly working together when we climbed up the wall to get into the nooks of the car park for a photo!

Got a wall to share? Upload your imagery to Instagram with #theweeklywall and tag me so that I can share!

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